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Adults and Teens

We offer an array of opportunities for learning, creating, and sharing through art experiences at the Museum. Whether taking a class in our studios or hearing from an expert in our galleries, our visitors can choose from a variety of activities to engage with art. With established weekly programs like ArtBreak and Slow Art Sunday, or special events like First Thursday, Art On The Rocks, and teen nights, the BMA invites you to find a program that interests and excites you!

Art & Conversation: Haitian Flags from the Cargo Collection

Art & Conversation: Haitian Flags from the Cargo Collection

March 3, 2016

Ornately beaded and sequined flags, called drapo, play an important role in the Haitian religion of Vodoun. Curator Emily Hanna discusses the many sources of Haitian symbolism, from African religions and Roman Catholicism, to the Society of Freemasons.

Slow Art Sunday: La cascade à Tivoli

February 28, 2016

Slow food, slow living, slow… art? Unlock the secrets of works in the Museum’s collection by cultivating the art of looking slowly. Our docents ask and answer questions to help guide your slow art experience and foster conversation. Leave the Museum feeling inspired- not tired!

This Sunday, Master Docent Marlene Wallace will lead a discussion on La cascade à Tivoli by Claude-Joseph Vernet.

Haitian Vodou Ceremonies, Songs, and Sacred Objects

Haitian Vodou Ceremonies, Songs, and Sacred Objects

February 26, 2016

This lecture will discuss Haitian Vodou ceremonies that are dedicated to spirits, called loa. Songs, drumming, and sacred objects such as flags, rattles, and drums are used in the salutation of the spirits. This presentation includes field photographs, music and audiovisual documentation to help place this great and noble religious tradition in context.
Benjamin Hebblethwaite has a Ph.D. in French Linguistics from Indiana University (2007) and he works as an Associate Professor at the University of Florida. He is the author of Vodou Songs in Haitian Creole and English (Temple University Press) and Yon sezon matchyavèl/Une saison en enfer (L’Harmattan), with Jacques Pierre. He has published articles on Haitian Creole historical linguistics, language policy in Haiti, Haitian Creole literacy, bilingualism among Haitian Americans in Miami, and comparative religion. He is currently working on the National Endowment for the Humanities-funded “The Archive of Haitian Religion and Culture” (The Vodou Archive) and a book project on Arabic and Islamic influences in contemporary French, German and Dutch cultures.

Visually Impaired Program: How the West was Won - and Lost

Visually Impaired Program: How the West was Won – and Lost

February 24, 2016

In this program for adults, specially trained docents present the Museum’s collection by means of verbal descriptions, three-dimensional tactile models based on original works of art, and sculpture. The experience may be enhanced by related music and/or art-making to provide multi-sensory access to the visual arts.

The American West was depicted as the shining future filled with opportunity for our country after the turmoil of the Civil War. But, at what cost? What about those other “Americans” who already lived there? What was their future?

Space is limited; reservations are required. Please RSVP by Friday, February 19.

VIP tours are also available for school-age or adult groups. To reserve your spot or learn more about group tours, call 205.254.2964.

Slow Art Sunday: G.E. Mask and Scarification

February 21, 2016

Slow food, slow living, slow… art? Unlock the secrets of works in the Museum’s collection by cultivating the art of looking slowly. Our docents ask and answer questions to help guide your slow art experience and foster conversation. Leave the Museum feeling inspired – not tired!

This Sunday, Docent Katia Kiss Miller will lead a discussion on G.E. Mask and Scarification by Willie Cole.

Artbreak

February 16, 2016

On the third Tuesday of each month, the Curator of Education and/or Education Department staff lead visitors on a thirty to forty-five minutes exploration of one work of art in the galleries. Through a series of close-looking techniques and questioning, this free experience helps build the visitor’s interpretive skills across the comprehensive-range of art periods and canons represented by the BMA’s collections. Stay for lunch at Oscar’s and they will throw in a free dessert!

Slow Art Sundays: Hiawatha and Minnehaha

February 14, 2016

Slow food, slow living, slow… art? Unlock the secrets of works in the Museum’s collection by cultivating the art of looking slowly. Our docents ask and answer questions to help guide your slow art experience and foster conversation. Leave the Museum feeling inspired – not tired!

This Sunday, Docent Mary Lynda Crockett leads us in a discussion on Hiawatha and Minnehaha by Edmonia Lewis.

Visually Impaired Program: How the West was Won - and Lost

Visually Impaired Program: How the West was Won – and Lost

February 13, 2016

In this program for adults, specially trained docents present the Museum’s collection by means of verbal descriptions, three-dimensional tactile models based on original works of art, and sculpture. The experience may be enhanced by related music and/or art-making to provide multi-sensory access to the visual arts.

The American West was depicted as the shining future filled with opportunity for our country after the turmoil of the Civil War. But, at what cost? What about those other “Americans” who already lived there? What was their future?

Space is limited; reservations are required. Please RSVP by Wednesday, February 10.

VIP tours are also available for school-age or adult groups. To reserve your spot or learn more about group tours, call 205.254.2964.