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Adults and Teens

We offer an array of opportunities for learning, creating, and sharing through art experiences at the Museum. Whether taking a class in our studios or hearing from an expert in our galleries, our visitors can choose from a variety of activities to engage with art. With established weekly programs like ArtBreak and Slow Art Sunday, or special events like First Thursday, Art On The Rocks, and teen nights, the BMA invites you to find a program that interests and excites you!

Salvador's Deli

Salvador’s Deli

March 13, 2016

Salvador’s Deli is an event created to award art materials to greater Birmingham area visual art teachers and students in desperate need of art supplies for their classrooms. Proceeds help put art supply kits directly in the hands of these teachers and students. Each kit includes all of the materials necessary for an art project of the teacher’s choice, for up to 29 students.

The event will feature art made from food by local artists and art students. Our celebration will join Birmingham’s burgeoning art and food communities to create an event worth looking forward to each year. Salvador’s Deli will be a fun evening of local music, food, and art. Celebrity judges will vote on winners and you can cast your own vote with the People’s Choice Award!

If you are interested in submitting artwork or for more information about the event, please visit their website. The deadline for submitting an application for entry is February 29.

Slow Art Sunday: Nydia, The Blind Girl of Pompeii

March 13, 2016

Slow food, slow living, slow… art? Unlock the secrets of works in the Museum’s collection by cultivating the art of looking slowly. Our docents ask and answer questions to help guide your slow art experience and foster conversation. Leave the Museum feeling inspired- not tired!

This Sunday, Docent Mary Helen Crowe will lead a discussion on Nydia, The Blind Girl of Pompeii by Randolph Rogers.

Holi Festival

Holi Festival

March 12, 2016

The Museum and ICS are thrilled to host Holi, the Indian celebration of color for the sixth year in a row! Last year, over 2,000 people came out to enjoy classical Indian and Bollywood style dancing and music, food, storytelling, art-making, and gallery exploration.

The Museum has one of the largest collections of Asian art in the Southeast, so there is plenty to see! The day ends with a huge celebration outside to play Holi, which involves the throwing of powdered colors, a traditional part of Holi celebrations. Make sure to wear something you don’t mind having to wash! There is truly something for everyone.

Visually Impaired Program: Ceramics at the BMA

Visually Impaired Program: Ceramics at the BMA

March 12, 2016

In this program for adults, specially trained docents present the Museum’s collection by means of verbal descriptions, three-dimensional tactile models based on original works of art, and sculpture. The experience may be enhanced by related music and/or art-making to provide multi-sensory access to the visual arts.

The BMA has become an important center for the study of ceramics from all parts of the world. This tour will explore examples of ceramics from Asia, Europe, and America with music and tactile objects enhancing the experience.

Space is limited; reservations are required. Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 9.

VIP tours are also available for school-age or adult groups. To reserve your spot or learn more about group tours, call 205.254.2964.

Slow Art Sunday: Barking Up the Wrong Tree

March 6, 2016

Slow food, slow living, slow… art? Unlock the secrets of works in the Museum’s collection by cultivating the art of looking slowly. Our docents ask and answer questions to help guide your slow art experience and foster conversation. Leave the Museum feeling inspired- not tired!

This Sunday, Master Docent Judy Cook will lead a discussion on Barking Up the Wrong Tree by F.W. Edmond.

Oscar's Sunday Brunch

Oscar’s Sunday Brunch

March 6, 2016

Enjoy delicious, locally-grown dishes from Oscar’s seasonal brunch menu in the beauty and comfort of the Museum with your family and friends. Space is limited. To make reservations, call 205.328.7850 or click here to reserve your spot online.

Eivor and Alston Callahan Lecture: India’s Post-Partition Identity and the Cinematic Image

Eivor and Alston Callahan Lecture: India’s Post-Partition Identity and the Cinematic Image

March 5, 2016

In August 1947, the Independence that India and Pakistan claimed was accompanied by a Partition of the Indian subcontinent, a geographic division that brought large-scale ethnic violence and mass migrations. Over a period of many months (and in the case of partitioned Bengal, years), at least fourteen million people—Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims—fled their homes and homelands, crossing over the newly created borders to become refugees. At least one million were killed in ethnically-charged riots and pogroms, and women by the tens of thousands (possibly more) were raped or abducted. This overwhelming tragic saga of religious conflicts, nationalist mobilizations, and plight of refugees came to constitute a critical aspect of politics and social life in independent India and informed popular culture in various ways. Yet, for several decades after, mourning and even memory of the events of 1947 and 1948 was suppressed. The trauma as well as the loss of “what might have been” was consciously and conspicuously ignored in most forms of public culture.

Coincidentally, the the years following Independence and Partition are regarded as the “Golden Age” of Indian cinema, and in these years the self-image of a new nation began to be narrated through film. This talk, given by Cathleen Cummings, Ph.D., will look at cinematic images of the 1950s and early 1960s and consider how Indian identity was being reformulated and articulated in the national cinema. Dr. Cummings will also consider ways in which the cinematic image helped mourn the nation’s collective trauma in indirect ways, and how the twin demands of forgetting and remembrance of Partition were negotiated, drawing from such films as Awara (Raj Kapoor, 1951), Pyaasa (Guru Dutt, 1957), and other classics of the era.

The Refined Art of Collection Building: An Evening with the Experts

March 3, 2016

The Birmingham Museum of Art and Christie’s present The Refined Art of Collection Building: An Evening with the Experts.

Diligence, discernment, and discipline are key ingredients to building a valuable collection, whether as an institution or an individual. Join the Birmingham Museum of Art and Christie’s for a panel discussion that explores the delicate process of assembling and managing a collection from both perspectives.

Panelists:
Gail Andrews: R. Hugh Daniel Director, Birmingham Museum of Art
Anne Forschler: Chief Curator and The Marguerite Jones Harbert and John M. Harbert III Curator of Decorative Arts, Birmingham Museum of Art
Nan Skier: Private Collector and Member of the Board of Trustees, Birmingham Museum of Art
Jody Wilkie: International Specialist Head of European Ceramics and Glass, Christie’s

Moderator:
Graham Boettcher: Deputy Director and The William C. Hulsey Curator of American Art, Birmingham Museum of Art

First Thursday: After Hours At The Museum

First Thursday: After Hours At The Museum

March 3, 2016

Your Night at the Museum!

The Birmingham Museum of Art is pleased to present an after-hours experience on the first Thursday of each month. Wander the galleries, sip cocktails in the garden, catch a movie, or sit down with friends for tapas at Oscar’s. The Museum is open for your enjoyment until 9PM.

Please note that costs apply for purchase of tapas and/or cocktails.

5-9PM: Tapas and cocktails in the café.

5-9PM: Live Music
7PM: The Refined Art of Collection Building: An Evening with the Experts, presented by the BMA and Christie’s. Click here to learn more about this exciting panel discussion.

Art & Conversation: Haitian Flags from the Cargo Collection

Art & Conversation: Haitian Flags from the Cargo Collection

March 3, 2016

Ornately beaded and sequined flags, called drapo, play an important role in the Haitian religion of Vodoun. Curator Emily Hanna discusses the many sources of Haitian symbolism, from African religions and Roman Catholicism, to the Society of Freemasons.