What’s Lost is Found

In May 2015, The Do Good Fund, a non-profit organization that acquires and exhibits photographs made in the American South, invited Lauren Henkin to be an artist-in-residence for a month in Hale County. As a photographer, Henkin was familiar with images of Hale County from the iconic photographs of Walker Evans, William Christenberry, and Gordon Parks among others. Some of these photographs can be found in the permanent collection of the Birmingham Museum of Art. The Museum became interested in Henkin’s photographs initially because they continued the tradition of photographing the South and particularly photographing Alabama. After spending a month in Hale County, Henkin produced a portfolio of over 50 photographs, 15 of which the Museum selected to form the exhibition What’s Lost is Found, opening on November 4, 2016.

Having moved 10 times in the last decade, Henkin said she felt “grounded in Alabama- the darkened soil acting as magnetic pull.” Aware of being an outsider from Maine, she said, “I knew I would never be able to take ownership of the place, but I could remark on its lush landscape, its humble people, its primaries of reds, blues, and greens.” Talking about her experience in Hale County and the photographs she made while there, Henkin said, “The place itself is sacred terrain, drawing artists from near and far, trying to define a place and people that carry a history of the medium. It is a region filled with a rich complexity that cannot be explained or dissected.”  

Born in Washington, D.C., Henkin grew up in Maryland and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Washington University in St. Louis. She now splits her time between Maine and New York City. Henkin’s work is focused on the tension between preservation and extinction as told through the American vernacular. Her work can be found in collections across the country including the Cleveland Museum of Art, Portland Art Museum, and the Smith College Museum of Art among others. She has been published in several prestigious publications including Oxford American, New York Magazine, and The Washington Post. Henkin recently opened a solo exhibition titled Second Nature at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art.

Henkin’s exhibition What’s Lost is Found opens on Friday, November 4 beginning with a talk by the artist at 6pm. The exhibition closes on June 11, 2017. 

What’s Lost is Found is curated by Wassan Al-Khudhairi, Hugh Kaul Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

"The life of the flesh is in the blood." 2015. 24x30. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "By man his blood shall be shed." 2015. 30×24. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "Love your neighbor as yourself." 2015, 30×24. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for a time of adversity." 2015. 30×24. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "The name of the LORD is a fortified tower; the righteous run to it and are safe." 2015. 24×30. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "In all your ways acknowledge Him, And He will make your paths straight." 2015. 24×30. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "Look to the lord and his strength." 2015. 30×24. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "The lifting up of my hands as the evening offering." 2015. 24×30. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "After a fire a sound of gentle blowing." 2015. 24×30. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "Forsaken among the dead." 2015. 24×30. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin. "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness." 2015. 24×30. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "Come, let us sing for joy to the LORD; let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation." 2015. 30×24”. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin. "The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it." 2015. 30×24. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "So you will walk in the way of good men And keep to the paths of the righteous." 2015. 30×24. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin "And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together." 2015. 30×24. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin
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"Come, let us sing for joy to the LORD; let us shout aloud to the Rock of our salvation." 2015. 30×24”. Pigment print © Lauren Henkin.